Macbeth

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Soliloquy: Sharing your own thoughts aloud (in a theatre)

Act 1, Scene 1: 3 witches met on a heath and prophesised about when they were going to meet again and plan encounter with Macbeth. Thunder and lightening was striking at the time.

Act 1, Scene 2: King Duncan rewards Macbeth with the title of Thane of Cawdor because of his courage in the battle.

Act 1, Scene 3: Macbeth and Banquo see the witches on the heath and the witches told them that Macbeth will be king some day, and that Banquo won’t be king himself, but his children will. Macbeth ends the scene by talking to the camera himself.

Act 1, Scene 4: Macbeth learns that King Duncan’s son, Malcolm (Prince of Cumberland), is the next in line for King, instead of Macbeth himself. He thinks he has to do something about this due to the prophecy.

Act 1, Scene 5: Lady Macbeth gets a letter from Macbeth and gets excited at the thought of her being queen. She plans on killing King Duncan when he visits.

Act 1, Scene 6: King Duncan arrives at the castle, and praises Macbeth yet again. They talk about the beauty of the house- but it is actually rotting on the inside, much like the owners of it.

Act 1, Scene 7: Macbeth contemplates whether or not to kill King Duncan, and decides not to. However, even though he is reluctant,  Lady Macbeth changes his mind. They plan to kill him in his sleep, by making the guards too drunk to notice.

Act 2, Scene 1: Macbeth starts to feel guilty for his plans to kill King Duncan. Then, he has a dream of a dagger that is calling out to him- probably because his mind is filling with evil.

Act 2, Scene 2: Macbeth kills King Duncan and his guards, while Lady Macbeth puts the daggers and wipe blood on the guard’s hands to frame them. Macbeth is very depressed about killing them.

Act 2, Scene 3: Duncan’s sons, Lady Macbeth, Macbeth, Poerters, Macduff, and more people came do Macbeth’s house to find Duncan and the guards dead. After learning that they may become a target, Donolbain ran away to Ireland, and Malcolm went to England.

Act 2, Scene 4: Ross tells Macduff that since Duncan’s children fled, they must be guilty, or in suspicioun of being guilty. So, Macbeth is next in line to become the King of Scotland.

Act 3, Scene 1: Macbeth has a suspicioun that Banquo might know about how he killed Duncan (because of the 3 witches), and because Banquo’s son could be King eventually. So while Banquo and his son are out riding, he plans to send someone to kill them both.

Act 3, Scene 2: Lady Macbeth is becoming guilty of the bad deeds they have done, and doesn’t find being Queen as great as she would’ve thought. When she tries to tell this to Macbeth, he says that everything is fine, and that he will kill Banquo and his son, but doesn’t give too much details. He tells her to hide her face from showing what she is feeling on the inside.

Act 3, Scene 3: One more men is sent with the other two to kill Banquo and his son (Fleance). When they successfully kill Banquo, Fleance manages to escape, the men filling only half of their task. The new man killed the other two that Macbeth sent, leaving only one (in case the other two told someone about Macbeth’s murders.

Act 3, Scene 4:  Lennox and another lord have a suspicioun that Macbeth was responsible for the death. Then Macbeth comes by and they tell him about Macduff fleeing to England. And Macbeth plots to kill everyone at Macduff’s castle as a warning to not fight back.

Act 4, Scene 1: Combined with previous

Act 4, Scene 2: Lady Macduff talks to Ross about how she is angry and thinks Macduff is a traitor for running off. Then, she tells her son that Macduff is dead, but the boy knows she isn’t telling the truth. Then, a messenger comes in to warn them of the murderurs that arrive soon after. They kill her and her son.

Act 4, Scene 3: Macduff gets tested for his loyalty after he leaves his wife and children back in his castle. Then, he recieves news of the killing of his family, and decides to create an army to send to Macbeth.

Act 5, Scene 1: One of Lady Macbeth’s servants call a doctor to watch her since she keeps sleepwalking. The doctor doesn’t witess anything until the third day, when he sees Lady Macbeth rubbing her hands and holding a lantern. In the process, she confesses about Duncan, Banquo, and the other killings her and her husband have done.

Act 5, Scene 2: Scottish rebel army is waiting for the England army to arrive. They find out Macbeth is waiting in his castle, assembling his own army.

Act 5, Scene 3: He’s in his army room, very confident (because of what the three witches said) that he is going to win this battle. He asked the doctor about Lady Macbeth, and he says that she needs to cure herself.

Act 5, Scene 4: The English army is camoflagued as Birnam Wood, which lets the prophecy take place of the approaching forest.

Act 5, Scene 5: Macbeth becomes aware that his wife threw herself off the building and died. Then, he recieves news of the approaching Birnam woods and remembers the prophecy.

Act 5, Scene 6: Malcolm and Macduff throw down their leafy disquise and lead into the castle.

Act 5, Scene 7: Macbeth kills a young man named Siward.

Act 5, Scene 8: The final scene. Macduff challanges Macbeth to a fight, and eventually reveals that he was born early by being “ripped through his mother’s stomach”. Macbeth realizes that he is no match, and has been tricked by the witches. He then dies, and Malcolm becomes the new King of Scotland.

Macbeth Visual Literary & Paragraph

Frame Analysis 

Grammar

September 4, 2014:

We learned about the difference between active and passive voices. An active voice is putting the noun before the verb- a more proffecient sentance. A passive voice is having the noun after the verb, or not there at all.

For example:

Active: Colin rolled over in the foreign bed, and for a few slow seconds, as he squinted into the darkness, he felt good. – An Abundance of Katherines – John Green

Passive: A picture on the mantel above their fireplace caught Colin’s eye, and he walked over to it. – An Abundance of Katherines – John Green
September 23, 2014: Commas

After watching the comma video and the noredink assignment, I learned a lot about commas. I learned that you can use a comma when linking two independent clauses with a conjunction (FANBOY). Another way is when you want to separate phrases that don’t need to be there. When you want to adress someone in particular, you should use a comma. You can also use a comma when making a list. Another way is when you have more than one adjective describing a noun. After introductory phrases or clauses, dates, ending of a letter, between cities and cities (geographic locations). You shouldn’t use a comma in run on sentances (creates comma splice), when separating two independant clauses with no conjunction, after the conjunction, and when separating a dependant and indepenant clause with a conjunction are all instances to not use a comma in.

October 6, 2014: Dialouge

After watching the dialouge video and writing the practice piece, I learned about punctuating dialouge. I learned that you should always make a new paragraph with an indent when a new speaker talks. Also, that if you write a dialouge such as “Hi”!, it is incorrect. The punctuation has to be inside the speech bubbles: “Hi!”. Another concept I learned was that we should write dialouge with a comma after what is spoken. “I like pie,” Mary said. That sentance is correct because it has punctuation that fits with what is written. NEVER leave a piece of dialogue with no punctuation.

October 16, 2014: Tense Table 

Tenses Table

October 16, 2014: Sentence Typed P1

Simple Sentences are called in depended clause and contain a subject and a verb. It has to make sense.

For Example: She looked at John

Compound Sentence is a sentence with two independent clauses connected with a ‘FANBOY’ conjunction. FANBOY stands for: For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, So.

For Example: Sasha bought watermelons for her party so everyone will have a good time. 

Complex Sentence: Made up of the ‘Main Clause’, which has the main information. These sentences also have one or more ‘Subordinate Clauses’ which give more extra details. Some Subordinating Conjunctions are after, because, since, though, so that, while, etc. It can come at any point in the sentence.

For Example: I enjoyed the party because all of my friends were there. 

Compound- Complex Sentences has at least two main clauses and one subordinate clause.

For Example: Even though I want to go on vacation, I am sick so I can’t. 

 To Make Complex Sentences, you Should:

  • Start with 2 adjectives
  • Start with a ‘ly’ word
  • Start with a ‘ing’ word
  • End with a ‘ing’ word
  • Sandwich technique
  • Prepositional phrase
  • Start with a conjunction
  • End with a conjunction
  • Simile

Goals

Quarter One:

Reading: By the end of the quarter, I will read 9 books or more, each of different genres. Instead of reading so much realistic fiction, I will read more Non-Fiction, Adventure, Mystery, etc. I will try to read 9 books by the end of Quarter One. This can happen because I will keep getting book recommendations and not only read realistic fiction. I will have to look at my reading log to see which genres to focus on. The deadline is Quarter One. If I read one book every week, I can achieve this goal.

Writing: My goal for writing is to improve on my sentence structure. I will have to start sentences with different formats and not always with ‘I’ and ‘The’. For every three sentences, I can try to use a new sentence starter/format. This can happen if I work on WPP and play a few of the sentence structure games a week. It is realistic because I can use WPP to review sentence structure and practice in my writing. My deadline is to improve by the end of Quarter One (October 17). I will prove this by showing my improvements in writing pieces and WPP.

Goals Presentation:

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Quarter Two:

Reading: My reading goal for this coming semester is to continue to read 9 or more books. I also want to read at least one book from the following genres; Historical Fiction, Poetry, Fantasy, Humor, and Mystery. This will help me expand my variety of genres. I want to achieve this goal by December 18 (End of Quarter 2). To make this goal happen, I will have to consistantly read new genres and finish at least one book per week. I will prove this by looking at my learning log at the end of the quarter and seeing the variety.

Writing: My writing goal for this semester is to build up my list of wonder words and use some in my writing. If I do this, my word choice will be better and I will have more of a variety of vocabulary. This will be achieved if I work hard to add more to my wonder words wall and make sure to use them frequently in writing/conversation. This needs to be achieved by December 18. I will prove this by looking at my writing pieces and checking for wonder words (highlight/circle).

Work Habits: December 15, 2014:

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Quarter Three:

Reading: My reading goal for quarter three is to read 6 or more books. I want to continue to expand my variety in genres throughout the semester. I want to achieve this goal by March 20 (End of Quarter 3). To make this goal happen, I will have to consistantly read new genres and finish at least one book per week. I will prove this by looking at my learning log at the end of the quarter and looking at the variety in genres.

Writing: My writing goal for quarter three is the same as last quarter. I was unsuccesful in using wonder words in my writing. So, for the upcoming quarter, I want to build up my list of wonder words and use a few of them in my writing. If I do this, my word choice will improve to have more of a variety of vocabulary. This will be achieved if I add at least 5 wonder words from each book I read, and make sure to use them frequently in writing/conversation. My goal should be achieved by March 20 (End of Quarter 3). I will prove this by looking at my writing pieces and checking for wonder words (highlight/circle), and showing my wonder words wall.

Q3 Presentation

Quarter 4 Goals:

Reading: After the parent teacher conferences, I realized that a good reading goal for me would be to read more of the “classic” novels or non-fiction books because I usually just stick to reading realistic fiction novels. I can see if I achieved this goal by consistantly uploading my reading log with the different classics I’ll read. This is attainable because in the previous quarters I managed reading 11 or 12 books, so having two or three classics won’t be that challenging to read. This is realistic because I will be able to read enough books for sure, and I will gain more vocabulary in the process. I have up until the end of the school year (end of quarter four) to complete this goal. 

Writing: For my writing goal, I realized that sometimes I make various mistakes in spelling and grammar (convention errors). This didn’t exactly show in the summaries, but in previous writing pieces throughout the year. I want to make at least three drafts and a plan for every writing piece I’ll do this year. This can be measured by screenshotting every draft and presenting them at the end of the quarter. This is attainable for me because I will be able to take the time to go through the pieces during the extra time I have during writing periods. This is realistic because I will anyways have extra time during writing times, so it is a good idea to include different drafts and changes I make. I will have to complete this by the end of quarter four. 

Work Habits

Goals Presentation

Writing

September 4, 2014:

I have been brainstorming to find topics for my personal narratives. I did this by listing a bunch of excperiences that were embarrassing, funny, or interesting. After that, I chose one story that I wanted to expand on and added more information to it. We then had to plan it out on a paper  Then, I started writing first drafts and introductions and conclusions. In the meantime, we also tracked other personal narratives using a similar sheet that we planned our own story on.

 

September 20, 2014: Personal Narrative Draft 2

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October 16: Wakeboarding Summative

November 12, 2014: Legalize It Persuasive Essay Jigsaw

November 12, 2014: Moms Argument Paper Jigsaw

December 9, 2014: Gun Control Summative

March 3, 2o15: Summaries Summative

Reading

Reading Log 

The Follower-Personal Narrative Tracker

I Confess-Personal Narrative Tracker

September 11: Popularity

September 15: Popularity Rubric

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September 23, 2014: My First Conk Rubric

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September 24, 2014: Chinese Cinderella Summative

 

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America the Not-so-Beautiful: January 6, 2015

Q2 Summative Reading Assesment- Teen Literature

Reading Rubric: Distopian

Reading Books

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Tuff Time: March 19, 2015

Are the Socs and Greasers really that different? Why or Why not?

I don’t think that the Socs and Greasers are not that different. They both face problems, but we only see the Greaser’s side to the story. As Cherrie said, “Things are rough all over.” I personally feel like the Socs and Greasers are pressured to be whatever the group says they are. It is kind of related to stereotypes because people think the Socs are rich and snobby, while the Greasers are supposed to tough and dangerous. Also, Cherrie told Ponyboy that she couldn’t really talk to him at school. And after the conversation and connection from that night, it is obvious that she would have wanted to talk to him if it weren’t for the pressure of the Socs. I feel like at the end of the story, the outsiders are Ponyboy and Cherrie because they both see the true good about both sides and don’t listen to the stereotypes. I feel like the only difference is that some Socs are meant to be “tuff” and nonchalant about everything to the point of faking, while the Greasers explain their true feelings.

Are there any connections you can make to any of the characters and/or their situation?

The connections that I can make to Cherrie’s situation is pretty much relating to our lives. Maybe she has the stress of living up to her parents and going to good colleges. But Ponyboy and the Greasers don’t exactly understand that stress, and think that it isn’t so much of a problem. The grass is always greener on the other side. I can’t really connect to any of the Greasers at this moment, but hopefully after learning more about the characters, I can figure out more to relate to.

 

Tuff Time: March 23, 2015

Why did Johnny kill Bob? 

I think that Johnny killed Bob because of two main reasons. One is because Bob was trying to drown Ponyboy, so Johnny wanted to save Ponyboy. Because of this he thought that the only way to make him stop was to kill him. I also think Johnny killed him to get back at him for jumping him in the lot a while ago. It was probably just impulse, but it still caused him to kill someone.

What could have been some alternatives?

Some alternatives could have been Johnny just calling the police. This is because Johnny just tried to help save a friend, and if the police were there, it would put him on the good side instead of being the one who’s running. Also, he could have just nicked Bob instead of full on killing him. He couldn’t have gotten in trouble for that, so it would have been a better option.

What do you think Ponyboy and Johnny’s situation prompted Ponyboy’s recitation of “Nothing Gold can stay”?

I think Ponyboy’s and Johnny’s situation prompted Ponyboy’s recitation of “Nothing Gold can stay” because they were in any  okay situation back home, that was fine to live with. Then suddenly, the situation got so much worse by Johnny killing Bob that they had to completely flee to the church in the countryside. Their old home seems like gold compared to the bad situation they’re in now. So this must have influenced Ponyboy to say, “Nothing Gold can stay.”

Who is innocent? Who has experience? (Think about all characters)

Before this chapter, I used to think that Johnny was the most innocent one. He seemed to be the victim instead of the bully, therefore seemed innocent. Or maybe I just think he is innocent because he was vulnerable. After reading this chapter, I learned that Johnny is no longer the innocent one, but one with experience- killing Bob. I definitely define Ponyboy as the innocent one now. I also think that’s why the book is called “The Outsiders”, because Ponyboy is one of the only one’s who’s different and innocent. I think that Cherrie Valance is also innocent like Ponyboy. I identify Sodapop in the middle. He has experience, but it does not seem as if he is like Dally or Two-Bit. I think Darry, Dallas, and Two-Bit are the ones who have experience. They come across as the tougher characters than the rest.

Summaries: Visual Literary Rubric

The Outsiders Literary Essay

The Outsiders Post-It Notes

Logos/Pathos/Ethos Reading Comprehension

Wonder Words Wall

1) Statuesque – A tall, pretty, and graceful woman. (adjective)

2) Unconventionally – Not based on the general or normal practices, but something different. (adjective)

3) Asphyxiation – Dying of lack of air. (verb)

4) Anvil – A heavy metal block with a pointed end that can be hammered and shaped. (noun)

5) Resonance – A low/deep sound. (noun)

6) Gesticulate – To use dramatic jestures instead of words. (verb)

7) Chakras – An Indian thought of 7 centers of spiritual power in our bodies. (noun)

8) Convulsing – To suffer violent involuntary muscle contractions which contorts limbs. (verb)

9) Swaggered – Walk or behave in a very arrogent way. (verb)

10) Irate – Being characterized by great anger. (adjective)

11) Mirth – Great laughter/amusement (noun)

12) Cretin – A stupid person. (noun)

13) Schizophrenic – A mentality or approach characterized by inconsistant elements. (noun)

14) Avail – to take advantage of an opportunity/resource. (verb)
The Death Cure – James Dasher

15) Chagrin – Annoyance at being embarrassed/failed. (noun)
The Death Cure – James Dashner

16) Bygoned – Belonging to an earlier time. (adjective)
The Death Cure – James Dashner

17) Apt – suitable in a certain circumstance. (adjective)
The Death Cure – James Dashner 

18) Incentive – The idea/reason someone is motivated to do something. (noun)
The Scorch Trials – James Dashner

19) Arduous – Involving hard effort. (adjective)
The Kill Order

20) Yahoos – An inconsiderate and violent person. (noun)
The Kill Order

21) Gyrate – Move rapidly in a circle. (verb)
The Kill Order

22) Beset – trouble someone persistantly (verb)
The Kill Order

23) Lax – Relaxed, and not too strict. (adjective)
The Kill Order

24) Inferno – A large, uncontrollable fire. (noun)
The Kill Order

25) Rendezvous – An agreed time to meeat at a place. (noun)
The Kill Order

26) Pell-Mell – In a very confused and unorganised manner. (adverb)
The Kill Order

27) Discernible – Able to be recegnized/ found out. (adjective)
The Kill Order

28) Iota – A REALLY small amount. (noun)
The Kill Order

29) Dotty – slightly mad/insne. (adjective)
The Kill Order 30)

Tangible – can be identified with touch. (adjective)
Inside Out & Back Again

31) Remnant – the part remaining after the other has been used. (noun)
Inside Out & Back Again

32) Diacritical – A sign written above or below a letter to indicate change in pronounciation. (noun)
Inside Out & Back Again

33) Lacquer – dried to form a hard coating for wood or metal. (noun)
Inside Out & Back Again

34) Amethyst – a precious stone which is purple. (noun)
Inside Out & Back Again

35) Whim – a sudden change of idea, usually unusual. (noun)
Inside Out & Back Again

36) Intermingling – to mix together (verb)
Inside Out & Back Again

37) Implore – beg someone to do something. (verb)
Inside Out & Back Again

38) Itinerary – a planned route. (noun)
ERB Test

39) Banal – obvious and boring. (adjective)
Paper 
Towns

40) Posterity – all future generations of people. (noun)
Paper Towns

41) Cacophony – a harsh mixture of sounds. (noun)
Paper Towns

42) Cavalier – showing lack of concern. (adjective)
Paper Towns

43) Ether – the heighest element. (adjective)
Paper Towns

44) Malfeasance – wrongdoing especially in the US (noun)
Paper Towns

45) Miscrant – a villan (noun)
Paper Towns

46) Serpentine – winding and twisting. (adjective)
Paper Towns

47) Vapid – dull and uninteresting. (adjective)
Paper Towns

48) Palpable – able to be touched. (adjective)
Guns, Crime and the Second Amendment

49) Citizenry – all the people in a place reguarded collectively. (noun)
Guns, Crime and the Second Amendment

50) Veto – a constitutional right to reject a decision by alawmaker. (noun)
Guns, Crime and the Second Amendment

51) Affirming – to state with publicity. (verb)
Guns, Crime and the Second Amendment

52) Ratification – to sign a treaty. (verb)
Guns, Crime and the Second Amendment

53) Morbid – characterized by having abnormal interests in disturbing topics. (adjective)
Looking for Akaska

54) Foray –  a sudden attack into enemy’s territory. (noun)
Looking for Akaska

55) Patriarchal – relating to a partriach. (adjective)
Looking for Akaska

56) Ostensibly – supposedly true, but not completely. (adverb)
Looking for Akaska

57) Ludicrously – so silly that is actually funny. (adjective)
Looking for Akaska

58) Briar – a number of prickly bushes. (noun)
Looking for Akaska

59) Fervent – displaying passionate intensity. (adjective)
Looking for Alaska

60) Esoteric – intended to be understood by a small group of people. (adjective)
Looking for Alaska

61) Blancmange – a sweet gelatin dessert. (noun)
Little Women

62) Ferrule – punishment by hitting the hand with a flat piece of wood. (noun)
Little Women

63) Wherry – a light rowboat used for carrying passangers. (noun)
Little Women

64) Pensive – engaged in deep thought. (adjective)
Little Women

65) Baize – a wool matrial, typically green, used to cover aprons. (noun)
Little Women

66) Pious – very relegious. (adjective)
Little Women

67) Ennui – a feeling of dissatification from lack of excitement. (noun)
Little Women

68) Omen – a sign of something supposed to happen. (noun)
Little Women

69) Gallivanting – roaming around for fun. (verb)
Little Women

70) Solace – To comfort or console. (verb)
Little Women

71) Cherub – a cute, chubby cheeked child. (noun)
Little Women

72) Geraniums – a herbaceous shrub. (noun)
A Wrinkle in Time

73) Liverwurst – a seasoned meat. (noun)
A Wrinkle in Time

74) Tramp – to walk heavily and loudly. (verb)
A Wrinkle in Time

75) Supine – Lying facing upwards. (adjective)
A Wrinkle in Time

76) Frivoling – Not having a serious purpose. (adjective)
A Wrinkle in Time

78) Avid – showing a keen interest for something. (adjective)
A Wrinkle in Time

79) Belligerent – being hostile and aggressive. (adjective)
A Wrinkle in Time

80) Inad – lacking the quanitity or quality required. (noun)
A Wrinkle in Time

81) Dilapidated – an object in state of disrepair as a result of age. (adjective)
A Wrinkle in Time

82) Paltry – a very small amount. (adjective)
A Wrinkle in Time

83) Metamorphose –  an insect going through metamorphosis. (verb)
A Wrinkle in Time

84) Patchouli – a strongly scented mint shrub. (noun)
Girl Online

85) Trilby – a soft felt hat. (noun)
Girl Online

86) Reputes – Someone’s opinions about something. (noun)
Girl Online

87) Reverbrates – a loud noice repeating several times in an echo. (verb)
Girl Online

88) Adamant – refusing to take someone else’s viewpoints. (adjective)
Girl Online

89) Conspiratorially – someone who takes part of conspiracies. (noun)
Girl Online

90) Girders – a big iron beam used for building bridges. (noun)
Girl Online

91) Inciting – to encourage violent behaviour. (verb)
Girl Online

92) Impromptu – done without being planned. (adverb)
Girl Online

93) Plait – a single length of hair or rope material. (noun)
Girl Online

94) Parcels – an object or collection of objects wrapped in paper. (noun)
Girl Online

95) Canapés – a small bread with a savory topping. (noun)
Girl Online

96) Bauble – a small decoration to hang on a Christmas tree. (noun)
Girl Online

97) Kitsch – art, objects, or design that are “poor taste”. (noun)
Girl Online

98) Vacuous – showing a lack of intelligenence. (adjective)
Girl Online

99) Inane – lacking sense or meaning. (adjective)
Girl Online

100) Pascal – a high-level structured computer programming language. (noun)
Girl Online

101) Psychoanalyze – a system of psychological therapy that’s goal is to treat medical disorders. (noun)
The Program

102) Opting – to decide something from different options. (verb)
The Program

103) Lethargic – feeling lazy or tired. (adjective)
The Program

104) Infatuated – being inspired by a short-term admiration. (verb)
The Program

105) Euphoric – characterized by an intense feeling of happiness or joy. (adjective)
The Program

106) Intravenously – existing inside of -or being put inside of- veins. (adjective)
The Program

107) Tsks – another form of saying ask. (verb)
The Program

108) Contraband – goods that have been smuggled illegally. (noun)
The Program

109) Lobotomized – to perform a surgical operation to formally treat mental ilnesses. (noun)
The Program

110) Complacent – showing happiness in your own achievements. (adjective)
The Program

111) Inhibitor – a substance that slows down a certain chemical reaction. (noun)
The Program

112) Anarchist – someone who believes in absence of government. (noun)
The Program

113) Antics – silly and over the top behaviour. (noun)
The Program

114) Imperative – something of great importance. (adjective)
The Program

115) Epitome – a person or thing that is a perfect example of what is correct. (noun)
The Treatment

116) Bougainvillea – a decorative plant. (noun)
The Treatment

117) Thrall – someone that works for a higher power. (noun)
The Treatment

118) Ecstasy – a great feeling of happiness and excitement. (noun)
The Treatment

119) Vexing – to make someone annoyed, frustrated, or worried in dire matters. (verb)
The Treatment

120) Vixen – a female fox. (noun)
The Treatment

121) Eradication – the complete destruction of something. (noun)
The Treatment

122) Repression – to drug someone by force. (noun)
The Treatment

123) Somber – to show deep sadness or depression. (adjective)
The Treatment

124) Loiter – to wait around with no reason. (verb)
The Treatment

125) Chivalrous – charming behaviour of men towards women. (adjective)
The Treatment

126) Snide – mocking in a way that is not too obvious. (adjective)
The Treatment

127) Piques – feeling irritated because of slight in one’s pride. (noun)
The Treatment

128) Demur – disagree to cooperate or do something. (verb)
The Treatment

129) Procure – to obtain something with care and effort. (verb)
The Treatment

130) Catatonic – acting in strange behaviour resulting from disturbed mental state. (verb)
The Treatment

131) Epidemic – an infectious disease spreading through a society at a certain time. (noun)
The Treatment

132) Duress – using violence to force someone into doing an action against their will. (noun)
The Treatment

133) Mausoleum – an impressive array of tombs. (noun)
The Treatment

134) Bludgeon – a thick stick with a heavy end that is used as weaponry. (noun)
The Treatment

135) Camaraderie – mutual trust between people who spend lots of time together. (noun)
The Treatment

136) Hematoma – a solid swelling of clotted blood in the tissues. (noun)
The Treatment

137) Myraid – a countless number of people or things. (noun)
The Treatment

138) Moot – A subject that is very debatable or not 100% confirmed. (adjective)
The Treatment

139) Statutory – required or needed by a written law. (noun)
The Treatment

140) Penitentiary – a person in prison for committing serious crimes. (noun)
The Treatment

141) Pallid – dull or lacking color. (adjective)
The Light in the Forest

142) Covet – wanting to have something that belongs to another. (verb)
The Light in the Forest

143) Affront – to insult someone. (noun)
The Light in the Forest

144) Volition – making your own choice. (noun)
The Light in the Forest

145) Brook – to deal with. (verb)
The Light in the Forest

146) Pertly – acting like a girl. (adjective)
The List

147) Splays – become wide or speparated.  (verb)
The List

148) Unnerving – make someone lose confidence. (verb)
The List

149) Encapsulated – to enclose something in a capsule. (verb)
The List

 150) Vices – rude or wicked behaviour. (noun)
The List

151) Kindred – One’s family relations. (noun)
The List

152) Coven – a meeting of witches. (noun)
The List

153) Belittled – dismiss something as unimportant. (verb)
The List

154) Akin – A simple character. (adjective)
The List

155) Taffeta – A fine silk material. (noun)
The List

156) Tandem – two people or machines working together. (noun)
The List

157) Benevolent – well meaning and kindly. (adjective)
The List

158) Begrudges – enying someone with something. (verb)
The List

159) Armoire – an antique wardrobe. (noun)
The List

160) Impasse – a situation where no progress is possible because of a disagreement. (noun)
The List

161) Subterfuge – deceit used to achieve a goal. (noun)
Let it Snow

162) Rote – repationtion of something to be learned. (noun)
Let it Snow

163) Inexorable – impossible to prevent. (adjective)
Let it Snow

164) Slalomed – a sporting event on water. (noun)
Let it Snow

165) Averse – having a strong dislike of something. (adjective)
Let it Snow

166) Oblong – a rectangular or flat figure with unequal adjacent sides. (noun)
Let it Snow

167) Cad – a man who behaves dishonorably. (noun)
Let it Snow

168) Wanly – a person’s complexion or appearance being very pale, looking ill. (adjective)
Let it Snow

169) Labrynith – a maze. (noun)
City of Ember

170) Incoherently – without making sense. (verb)
City of Ember

171) Egress – exiting or leaving a place. (noun)
City of Ember

172) Curtly – rudly brief. (adjective)
City of Ember

173) Mottled – marked with spots of color. (verb)
City of Ember

174) Delectable – delicious food or drink. (adjective)
City of Ember

175) Turmult – violent commotion. (noun)
City of Ember

176) Impudence – unashamed bravery. (noun)
City of Ember

177) Revved – a resolution of an engine per minute. (noun)
Thirteen Reasons Why

178) Marquee – a projection above a movie theatre entrance. (noun)
Thirteen Reasons Why

179) Kindred – associated by origin. (adjective)
Thirteen Reasons Why

180) Nostalgia – a longing for the past. (noun)
Thirteen Reasons Why

181) Reprecussions – an indirect effect of an action. (noun)
Thirteen Reasons Why

182) Serrated – having a notched edge for cutting. (adjective)
Thirteen Reasons Why

183) Amble – to walk at a really slow pace. (verb)
Fangirl

184) Irreconcilable – hard to be resolved. (adjective)
Fangirl

185) Guffawed – a loud, hearty laugh. (noun)
Fangirl

186) Fubar – our of order. (adjective)
Fangirl

187) Insinuate – to suggest something bad in an indirect way. (verb)
Fangirl

189) Peril – serious danger. (noun)
Fangirl

190) Appraising – asses the performance or quality of something. (verb)
Fangirl

191) Lamentable – really bad circumstances. (adjective)
Fangirl

192) Dormer – a window that projects vertically from a sloping roof.  (noun)
Fangirl

193) Rangy – a tall and slim person. (adjective)
Fangirl

194) Misnomer – a wrong name or term for something. (noun)
The Beginning of Everything

195) Brooding – showing deep thought about something sad. (adjective)
The Beginning of Everything

196) Ineptitude – showing lack of skill. (adjective)
The Beginning of Everything

197) Clandestine – keeping or doing something in secret. (adjective)
The Beginning of Everything

198) Tiered – a series of rows or levels placed above the other. (noun)
The Beginning of Everything

199) Astute – showing an ability to asses situations to your advantage. (adjective)
The Beginning of Everything

200) Panopticon – a  circular prison with cells around a central well. (noun)
The Beginning of Everything

201) Nay – another word for no. (adverb)
Wuthering Heights

202) Sinew – The parts of a system that binds it together. (noun)
Wuthering Heights

203) Vexatious – causing annoyance or frustration. (adjective)
Wuthering Heights

204) Unhasp – unfasten. (verb)
Wuthering Heights

205) Vagabond – a person who wanders from place to place without a home. (noun)
Wuthering Heights

206) Lattice – an interlaced pattern. (noun)
Wuthering Heights

207) Magistrate – a civil officer who administers the law. (noun)
Wuthering Heights

208) Beclouded – make obscure or confused. (verb)
Wuthering Heights

209) Emissaries – a person sent as a diplomatic person on a mission. (noun)
Wuthering Heights

210) Epiphany – a moment of suddent realization of something great. (noun)
It’s Kind of a Funny Story

211) Farce – a comic dramatic work. (noun)
It’s Kind of a Funny Story

212) Ideation – the formation of concepts. (noun)
It’s Kind of a Funny Story

213) Porous – a rock or material with holes liquid can pass through. (adjective)
It’s Kind of a Funny Story

214) Facsimile – an exact copy of something written. (noun)
It’s Kind of a Funny Story

215) Pithy – a fruit containing a lot of pith. (adjective)
It’s Kind of a Funny Story

216) Ante – a stake put up by a player in poker. (noun)
It’s Kind of a Funny Story

217) Seismic – relating to earthquakes. (adjective)
It’s Kind of a Funny Story

218) Yeomen – a freeholder. (noun)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

219) Stout – a person with a fat/heavy build. (adjective)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

220) Yew – a highly poisonous tree. (noun)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

221) Smote – past tenese of smite meaning to strike with a firm blow. (verb)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

222) Pikestaff – the wooden shaft of a pike. (noun)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

223) Drubbing – a beating or thrashing. (noun)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

224) Murrain – an infectious desiese affecting animals. (noun)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

225) Gaily –  in a cheerful way. (adverb)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

226) Vantage – a place showing a good view of something. (noun)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

227) Cudgel – a short stick used as a weapon. (noun)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

228) Ward – to ward someone off. (verb)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

230) Betwixt – an old term for between. (preposition & adverb)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

231) Gallant – brave or heroic behaviour. (adjective)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

232) Bethink – past tense, come to think. (verb)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

233) Hadst – old term for had/has. (verb)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

234) Agape – someone’s mouth wide in suprise/wonder. (adjective)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

235) Thither – or towards that place. (adverb)
The Adventures of Robin Hood

Giver Vocab Test

Outsiders Vocab Test